Wednesday, April 20, 2005

Things to do in Makati on a Saturday morning

the thursday group

Last Saturday, Poch insisted on bringing me to the Ayala Museum. I didn't feel like being cooped up in a stuffy museum but went with him anyway. Was I glad I changed my mind. It was surprising good! Next time you're in Manila, its a place to check out. Entrance fee is P150 for residents and P75 for seniors and children plus P100/person if you want a guide.

The first floor had paintings that the museum borrowed from the Singapore Museum... from a 1902 painting of Jose Rizal to more recent paintings by Filipino artists.

The second floor was the best part for me... It housed the dioramas from a few thousand years BC up until the end of the Japanese occupation. Plus a video board of the EDSA revolution. Did you know that the British actually occupied the Philippines towards the end of the 1800s? Another fact I didn't realize... Our national heroes weren't tall... Aguinaldo, Rizal, Bonifacio... they were all shorter than me.

The third floor housed the works of Fernando Zobel, Fernando Amorsolo and Juan Luna. I highly enjoyed the works of Amorsolo and Luna.

The fourth floor housed religious artifacts. I didn't get to explore this area as Poch said that it was a little boring. Maybe, next time, I'll get a chance to explore it on my own.

Anyway, check out www.ayalamuseum.org

By the way, if you find yourself in Makati on a Saturday morning, check out the park/parking lot in front of One Salcedo Place. It turns into a small market selling organic food and other Filipino delicacies from all over the country. Its sponsored by the Bel Air Village Association and is open every Saturday until 2pm.

1 Comments:

Blogger miranila said...

hi,

did you a wonder a bit, just like i did, about the seeming absence of women in the dioramas? Like Filipino women did nothing worthy to be remembered by history? of course,there were Tandang Sora, Gabriela Silang and the like but statistically parang less than 5% lang ang mga Pinay sa diorama.

1:25 PM, April 21, 2005  

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